Last week was an exciting week for the Greeks. Irene Kaldis is a brand new yia yia with the birth of her grandson. Peter Nassis, (Feb. 25, 2016). Peter (in Greek, Panayolis) Nassis is the son of Effey and George Nassis. Congratulations to the Kaldis and Nassis family. Irene will have her annual Easter celebration for us next week at “Always in Style.” Greek pastry treats will be in abundance and available to all. This year Greek Easter is May 1. The Greeks always have beautiful weather for Easter, non-Greeks never know. 

Almost as exciting as the birth of Peter Nassis was the “Trial of Antigone,” sponsored by the Hellenic Museum of Chicago and held at the Field Museum. In case you’re rusty on the facts of Antigone, here’s a short summary:

Antigone was the daughter of Oedipus, her brother Polynices was killed by his brother Etocles in an attempt to claim the throne of Thebes. Creon, the king, by questionable means, has decreed that Polynices should not be buried. This is abhorrent and against the wishes of the Gods. Antigone defied the law and buried her brother. In so doing, she condemned herself to death for what was considered an act of treason.

Judges for this trial were Hon. Richard Posner, Hon. William Bauer and Hon. Charles Kocoras. Attorneys for the defense of Antigone were Patrick Collins, partner at Perkins Coie LLP, and Patrick Fitzgerald, at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP. Attorneys for the prosecution were Robert A. Clifford, of Clifford Law, and Dan K. Webb, of Winston & Strawn LLP. 

The arguments on both sides were exciting and convincing. But Antigone was acquitted — alas, 2,000 years too late. She was stoned to death. This case was a turning point in western thought in that it gave rise to the idea of natural law versus civil law. As Judge Kocoras pointed out, Creon was going beyond the limits of the civil law and presuming to define laws of the afterlife. Clifford and Webb had the hardest job trying to convince us Antigone was guilty. Maybe 2,000 years ago, but by today’s thinking, she was a hero. As Patrick Collins pointed out, 2,000 years hence, a woman named Rosa Parks will defy an unjust law prohibiting her from riding on a bus.

There are many exciting programs at the Hellenic Museum, 333 S. Halsted. Phone 312-655-1234 for information. 

Birthdays this week are Jessica Conrad, Vandria Stevens, Victoria deJulio Hofstetter, Kathleen Pacudan, Matt Lyons, Morgan Rae Vobornik, Sarah Buzanski, Maya Keppner, Dino Panzani, Kevin Sallersite, Katie Miller, Geoff Flight, Sue Fishman, Dan Gallina, Steve Urban, Joe Gianelli, Alexandria Reina, Lauren Haeger, Ryan Mollo, Elle Daylo, Bob O’Brien, Andrew Huebner, Grace Snyder, and Peter Zapotek

Happy anniversary to Mr. & Mrs. Greg Horvath, Janet and Elmer Mittelhauser, and Isabel and Bob Fox.

 Jackie is a former Chicago and Elmwood Park schoolteacher with an undying love for music, friendly pets and a host of life’s other treasures too numerous to list. She was born on the far southwest side of Chicago in a great neighborhood when it was a great time to be young.

Jackie Schulz

Jackie is a former Chicago and Elmwood Park schoolteacher with an undying love for music, friendly pets and a host of life's other treasures too numerous to list. She was born on the far southwest side...